The Long Night is Coming

THE FIGHT AGAINST FREE RADICAL DAMAGE
– AND WHY IT MATTERS TO ENDOMETRIOSIS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*This post is strictly informational and not intended as medical or nutritional advice,
nor as a substitution for medical or nutritional advice.

Today we’re here to talk about fight against free radical damage and the part antioxidants play.

So are you present? As here come’s the science:

Free radicals are destructive molecules; highly unstable and extremely reactive, due to the fact that they bear an unpaired electron in their outer shell. They are ‘free’ because they float around freely in the body. This means that they are capable of causing degenerative damage on a cellular level through destabilising other molecules, and in doing so, create more free radicals.

Kind of like a white walker, they have the ability to create an army of the undead. So as you can imagine, this wreaks havoc in the body if left unchecked.

The antithesis to this is antioxidants.

Antioxidants are found in fresh, whole foods, as I’m sure you’re aware.

…And this is why everyone’s raving about antioxidants. They’re not just a marketing buzz word, they really are foundational and serve a core purpose.

That purpose is to create a protective barrier around molecules, shielding them from the free radicals. So you can see the antioxidants akin to the Night’s Watch or Jon Snow armed with dragon glass. They are vital to the cause.

So where are these free radicals coming from?

Some of the most common agents that increase our production of free radicals include:

  • Stress (including strenuous exercise)
  • Cigarette smoke 
  • Inadequate nutrition 
  • Alcohol 
  • Smoked, grilled and preserved food 
  • Rancid oils
  • Pollution 
  • UV exposure 
  • Contact with chemicals (commonly found in everyday toiletries, cleaning materials and beauty products)
  • Medications

Many of these you can avoid, with care, but it’s stress that I want to emphasis.

It took me quite a while, but I finally made self-care a priority. It cannot be a back burner concept, it can’t conditional – I’ll look after myself when XYZ. I mean, I had ridiculous excuses, like the dog is looking at me, I can’t relax until he’s had the best day ever and settles down. 

Yes you have commitments and responsibilities, and perhaps other’s needs must be met, but don’t forget about yourself. Your health is your priority and your responsibility.

A prime example of this, that I want to share as a cautionary tale, is when I put off my cervical screening test for years. No one wants to do that, so you don’t make the time to do it, and it’s easy to put your head above the clouds when it’s something you don’t want to do and go, “out of mind out of sight”.

When I finally went (still not my doing, my finance-now-husband literally made me go) it turned out my results were abnormal. Further tests… You’ve got pre-cancerous cells on the cervix and the inner wall.

If you’ve never had a health scare, or worse, that is never a letter you want to open, I can tell you. Now, I needed surgery because if the cellular changes progressed any deeper then they’ll enter the blood stream and that’s cervical cancer.

…And it’s preventative.

So the moral of the story is take care of yourself today and always. Healthcare should be preventative, first and foremost.

You’re here not just for endometriosis, but for your entire wellbeing.

If you have endometriosis, you are already pre-disposed to chronic inflammation – stress – and, in turn, free radical damage. A wildfire of free radicals can lead to degenerative diseases. This is why it is of the utmost importance to protect yourself by helping your body maintain healthy cells.

…And one way you can practise self (and cell) care on a daily basis is through upping your antioxidant intake through food.

Cue recipes.

                                                                                                                                           

 

endometriosis self-care

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The Endo Diet and its publications are strictly informational and not intended as medical advice, nor a substitution for medical advice. For medical advice, diagnosis and treatment please consult your physician or other qualified health providers. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

© 2018 The Endo Diet Ltd